Six months to go! Athletes share what half a year represents in numbers: Part 1

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 17: A detailed view of a ball is displayed during the Men's Quarterfinal Handball contest at Future Arena on Day 12 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games on August 17, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 17: A detailed view of a ball is displayed during the Men's Quarterfinal Handball contest at Future Arena on Day 12 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games on August 17, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)

As the world marks six months to go until the Olympic Games, Tokyo 2020 spoke to the athletes who will be competing about their life in numbers. 

Today - 23 January - marks six months to go until the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020. For the athletes who will participate, this represents the last stretch of the road to Tokyo. But it also means they will soon reach the most intense period of their preparation.

From now onwards, thousands of experienced and soon-to-be Olympians will gradually intensify their training in order to reach their peak condition by the time the Games begin.

But can you imaging what those numbers really mean? How many kilometres a runner runs, hours an equestrian rider spends on their horse or shots a handball player throws?

Tokyo 2020 spoke to the athletes about their training life in numbers, with six months to go until the Olympic Games.

Eduardo Gurbindo, Spain, Handball

There are only a few things that Eduardo Gurbindo hasn’t won. He was a European champion in 2018 - after a three-year streak on the podium - a bronze medallist at the 2011 World Championships and a 2015 Champions League winner with Barcelona, to name a few of his titles.

From his long list of victories, he’s only missing an Olympic medal - something he will be hoping to capture if he recovers from a knee injury in time for Tokyo 2020.

Click below to find out how many shots Gurbindo takes in six months.

Charline Picon, France, Sailing

Reigning RS:X Olympic Champion Charline Picon is training hard to win a second Olympic title at Tokyo 2020. It will be the final RS:X gold medal to be awarded as the windsurfing event will move to a foil format at the next Olympic Games.

Click below to find out how many kilometres the French windsurfer sails in six months.

Privel Hinkati, Benin, Rowing

Privel Hinkati is the first athlete from Benin to qualify for the rowing competition at an Olympics. Every morning, he wakes up at 5am to train in order to follow his Olympic dream.

Click below to find out how many paddle strokes Hinkati makes in six months.

Dolores Moreira, Uruguay, Sailing

Moreira made her debut on the Olympic stage at Rio 2016. At only 17-years-old she had the honour of being named Uruguay’s flagbearer.

In 2019, she qualified for Tokyo 2020 - the first Uruguayan to secure a place at the next Olympics.

"I would like to improve on my performance at Rio 2016. I had high expectations for Rio, but I was too nervous. Now I hope to do everything more calmly, improve my result and, God willing, I can dream about a medal race", she said in an exclusive interview with Tokyo 2020.

Click below to find out how many kilometres Moreira sails in six months.

Nicolas Navarro, France, Athletics (marathon)

After a childhood sprint on a bike, dreaming of pursuing a professional career as a road cyclist, Nicolas Navarro has now qualified for Tokyo 2020 - as a marathon runner

Click below to see how many kilometres Navarro runs in six months.

Yvonne Losos de Muñiz, Dominican Republic, Equestrian (dressage)

The Dominican Republic's dressage star Yvonne Losos de Muñiz competed in her first Olympics at Rio 2016, and she has already qualified for Tokyo 2020.

"Qualifying for Tokyo 2020 was absolutely amazing,” she told Tokyo 2020 in an exclusive interview.

Click below to find out how many hours Losos de Muñiz spends on a horse in six months.