Five moments when we said 'Viva México!'

A Mexico fan celebrates a goal by Diego Reyes durin a 2012 CONCACAF Men's Olympic Qualifying match.  (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)
A Mexico fan celebrates a goal by Diego Reyes durin a 2012 CONCACAF Men's Olympic Qualifying match. (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

Today is Cinco de Mayo, a date to commemorate Mexico. So in order to celebrate, here are the country's five best Olympic moments. 

Mariles and Capilla, their first superstars

Humberto Mariles Cortés won Mexico's first Olympic gold medal at London 1948, triumphing in the equestrian jumping competition along with his one-eyed horse Arete. The pair's legend grew even stronger as they also won a gold medal in the team event, along with Rubén Uriza and Alberto Valdez. According to the Mexican Olympic Committee, "experts in the field at the time claimed that Mariles was a rider who revolutionised the concept of equestrian, and he was someone who was ahead of his time who introduced discipline, order, control and the authentic submission of his horse during competition."

Mariles remains the Mexican athlete with the most gold Olympic medals. However, the Mexican with the most medals of any colour is diver Joaquín Capilla, who won bronze at London 1948, silver at Helsinki 1952 and gold and bronze at Melbourne 1956. All of this after overcoming a fear of heights, which made his success even more impressive.

Host nation in 1968

Mexico City was the first Latin American Olympic host city, 48 years before the next one was chosen (Rio 2016). In all, 5,516 athletes from 112 NCOs took part in the 1968 Olympic Games.

A total of 23 Olympic records were beaten in Mexico City, but perhaps the most memorable is the one that was broken by James Hines. The Team USA athlete became the first man to break the 10-second barrier in an Olympic 100m race, when he stopped the clock in 9.95 seconds.

Another important name from Mexico 1968 was Robert 'Bob' Beamon. He broke the long jump world record by leaping 8.90m with what as been called "the jump of the century." His record remained for over two decades, until Mike Powell beat it at the 1991 World Championships with a jump of 8.95m. Incredibly, Beamon still holds the Olympic record to this day.

But not everything is about records. Mexico also showed itself to be a pioneering host city when Enriqueta Basilio stepped up to light the Olympic cauldron - the first woman to ever do so. The moment stood as a beacon in a historical moment when people were protesting and fighting for their rights all over the world.

This leads on to the most memorable image from Mexico 1968, as sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos were captured raising their black-gloved fists at the medals ceremony as a protest against racial oppression in the United States.

Holding our breath in each diving event

Diving is the sport in which Mexico has won the most medals: 14 in total including one gold, seven silver and six bronze medals. Over 20 per cent of medals won by Mexico at the Olympic Games have been in the sport of diving. The last of these medals was the silver obtained by Germán Sánchez at Rio 2016 in the 10m platform competition. For the record, he also won another silver medal at London 2012 in the synchronised platform event.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 30:  German Sanchez Sanchez and Ivan Garcia Navarro of Mexico compete in the Men's Synchronised 10m Platform Diving on Day 3 of the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Aquatics Centre on July 30, 2012 in London, England.  (Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 30: German Sanchez Sanchez and Ivan Garcia Navarro of Mexico compete in the Men's Synchronised 10m Platform Diving on Day 3 of the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Aquatics Centre on July 30, 2012 in London, England. (Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)
2012 Getty Images

The 28 seconds of Oribe Peralta

Mexico's last gold medal was an unexpected one, as they triumphed against Brazil in the men's football final at London 2012. The battle dubbed Mexico vs. Neymar was won by forward Oribe Peralta, who scored both goals in a 2-1 victory. His first goal was scored after just 28 seconds - the quickest ever in an Olympic football final.

The outstanding atmosphere

In every Opening or Closing Ceremony, no matter what their expectations of winning are, Mexico show how much they value being at the Olympics. They soak up the atmosphere, live every moment and share their joy, traditions and culture with the world. So because of this and so many of other things, we can't say anything other than Viva Mexico!