Tokyo 2020 Medal Project: Towards an Innovative Future for All

We have closed the collection of small electronic devices for the Tokyo 2020 Medal Project at the end of Sunday 31 March 2019. The medal design will be announced in the summer of 2019.

The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo 2020) conducted the “Tokyo 2020 Medal Project” to collect small electronic devices such as used mobile phones from all over Japan to produce the Olympic and Paralympic medals.
In the two years between April 2017 and March 2019, 100 per cent of the metals required to manufacture the approximately 5,000 gold, silver and bronze medals have been extracted from small electronic devices that were contributed from people all over Japan. Every single medal that will be awarded to the athletes during the Tokyo 2020 Games are made from recycled metals. We are grateful for everyone's cooperation to this project. We hope that our project to recycle small consumer electronics and our efforts to contribute to an environmentally friendly and sustainable society will become a legacy of the Tokyo 2020 Games.
The “Tokyo 2020 Medal Project” is an official “Tokyo 2020 Nationwide Participation Programme”.

Project Result

We are pleased to introduce the result on the collection of used mobile phones and small electronic devices, and a number of other project-related initiatives.

Collection Period

From 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2019

Amount of Devices Collected

Amount collected by municipal authorities across Japan (used small electronic devices including mobile phones): Approx. 78,985 tons
Amount collected by NTT docomo shops across Japan (used mobile phones only): Approx. 6.21 million used mobile phones

Final Amount of Metals Collected

Gold: Appx. 32kg
Silver: Appx. 3,500kg
Bronze: Appx. 2,200kg

Participating Municipalities

1,621 muncipalities
Of the 1,741 wards/cities/towns/villages nationwide, over 90 per cent participated.

At the launch of the project on April 2017, a total of 624 municipal authorities were taking part in the project. However, by March 2019, this number had risen to 1,621.

From Collection to Smelting

The small electronic devices donated by people across Japan will be classified and dismantled and by contractors accredited in line with the government's Act on Promotion of Recycling of Small Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment. The medals will be produced after the gold, silver and bronze elements have been extracted by the smelting contractors.

Collection

Classification operations

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Classification operations

Dismantling

Extraction of gold

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Extraction of gold

Refining operation

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Refining operation

Pure gold!

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Pure gold!

Initiatives to Date

Since the project was launched in April, athletes, students from partner universities and members of the public cooperated with the project by collecting used small electronic devices.

Collection launch event

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1 April 2017 Collection launch event

1 April 2017 Collection launch event

Collection launch event

Takuro Yamada (left), Paralympic swimmer who won a bronze medal in the men's 50-metre freestyle event at the Rio n2016 Paralympic Games, and Takeshi Matsuda, a swimmer who won medals at the Beijing 2008, London 2012 and Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee staff taking part in the collection

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11 May 2017 Collection launched in the offices of the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee

11 May 2017 Collection launched in the
offices of the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee

Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee staff taking part in the collection

Staff in the offices of the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee began collecting used small electronic devices from fellow staff members.

Swimmers place their used devices in a collection box

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19 May 2017 Japan Open 2017 (swimming)

19 May 2017 Japan Open 2017 (swimming)

Swimmers place their used devices in a collection box

From left, swimmers Abbie Wood (GBR), Benjamin Proud (GBR) who competed at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, Kosuke Hagino (JPN) medallist at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, Sakiko Shimizu (JPN) who competed at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, and Takaaki Yamazaki, Mayor of Edo Ward, Tokyo.

Participants in the Japan Wheelchair Rugby Championships

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27 May 2017 2017 Japan Wheelchair Rugby Championships

27 May 2017 2017 Japan Wheelchair
Rugby Championships

Participants in the Japan Wheelchair Rugby Championships

From left, Jeff Butler and Ernie Chun, both silver medallists in Wheelchair Rugby at the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games

Judoka Ryunosuke Haga places a used device into the collection box.

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7 June 2017 Tokyo 2020 Athlete Visit

7 June 2017 Tokyo 2020 Athlete Visit

Judoka Ryunosuke Haga places a used device into the collection box.

Ryunosuke Haga, judoka and winner of a bronze medal at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

A young participant places a used device into the collection box

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17 June 2017 Japan Walk 2017

17 June 2017 Japan Walk 2017

A young participant places a used device into the collection box

Cooperation from event participants

Students who took part in the Tokyo 2020 School Festival place used devices in the collection box

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24 June 2017 Tokyo 2020 School Festival

24 June 2017 Tokyo 2020 School Festival

Students who took part in the Tokyo 2020 School Festival place used devices in the collection box

Cooperation from students who took part in the festival

A scene from a mobile phone recycling class

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5 September 2017 A mobile phone recycling class held by NTT DOCOMO for 6th grade students at the Hanesawa Elementary School, Mitaka City, Tokyo

5 September 2017 A mobile phone
recycling class held by NTT DOCOMO for 6th grade students at the Hanesawa Elementary School, Mitaka City, Tokyo

A scene from a mobile phone recycling class

To promote the Tokyo 2020 Medal Project, NTT DOCOMO is holding mobile phone recycling classes aimed at schoolchildren. The children learn about the history of the victory medals and the importance of recycling, and are encouraged to donate their used mobile phones to the project. The final results of the efforts of all those taking part in the project will be proudly displayed medalists around the necks of Olympic and Paralympic at the Tokyo 2020 Games.